Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Cabbage, Collard Greens, Red Onion, and Blood Orange Coleslaw

















Four loads of laundry, two batches of chicken broth (one for egg-lemon celeriac and carrot soup, and one for the freezer), one soba noodle, French lentil, and swiss chard main dish, and one glass of Maker’s Mark later, I’m now comfortably writing on my couch, cat elongated next to me, the Olympics playing in the background, writing about cabbage, collard greens, and blood orange coleslaw from last week’s pulled pork feast.

Everyone around me is sick lately. Norwalk virus is skulking invisibly through Marymount and Juilliard, leaving dehydrated, weak, and nauseous students in its wake, and students and teachers alike are sneezing and sniffling through classes, having succumbed to the common cold. I’ve managed to stay healthy, and eating cabbage may be the secret.

Eat more cabbage!

Along with other cruciferous vegetables, it is purported to reduce cancer risks (especially lung, stomach and colon) by as much as 69 percent, and according to new studies, signals genes to create more enzymes that are responsible for detoxification of the body. It is rich in vitamin C, a known antioxidant, and a powerful immune system booster. With just three servings a week, you’ll lower your risk of heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and breast cancer. If cabbage isn’t your thing, other cruciferous vegetables provide similar protection, so it’s wise to add more collard greens, brussels sprouts, kale, Swiss chard, broccoli or cauliflower to your diet.

You should listen to me, you snifflers; I haven’t been sick in over a year. (She says, touching wood, cabbage slaw in belly...)

Cabbage, Collard Greens, Red Onion, and Blood Orange Coleslaw


1/2 head cabbage, chopped
4 or 5 collard green leaves, chopped
1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
2 blood oranges, supremed
1 teaspoon celery seed
*homemade mayonnaise (optional -- if not using, add some olive oil, instead)
a bit of apple cider vinegar and maple syrup or sugar, if desired

Combine the first five ingredients. If using, add a little mayonnaise to combine. Splash in a bit of apple cider vinegar, and, if you like, add some maple syrup, or agave syrup, or sugar, to balance the acidity. (I didn’t add any additional sweetener, as the oranges were enough for me, and instead of plain apple cider vinegar, I used a bit of the barbecue sauce that I made for the pork.)

*Homemade Mayonnaise Recipe

1 egg yolk, room temperature
unflavored oil, such as grapeseed, or canola, about a cup, also at room temperature
lemon juice, to taste
salt

Whisk the egg yolk alone, and then, a few drops at a time, and very slowly, add the oil, whisking constantly, until the color of the yolk changes, and the oil incorporates with the egg, forming an emulsion. Continue adding the oil, slowly, and in a steady stream, until all is incorporated. Whisk in the lemon juice and the salt.

18 comments:

Chef E said...

Oh girl I just got some collard greens, have red onion, and I think maybe some cabbage, so your on, I am making this for my lunch tomorrow!

Banu said...

All right, Elizabeth! And soon I'm going to try your lamb; looks incredible!

Turkey's For Life said...

Wow! Looks fantastic. We make coleslaw all the time - with varying ingredients - but the one thing we've never thought of adding is blood orange. Will definitely try this version next time.

Richard said...

Aw but this means I wouldn't be able to just buy it out of a bag! :P

Banu said...

Bag! Richard! It's really so easy...if you have a knife and a cutting board, you'll have success with this, and you won't be worried about that creepy bacteria that lurks in those bags!

natural selection said...

This salad looks awesome! I think you are in controlling the weather with these bright delicious recipes bring on the spring Banu!

Citrus Quark said...

another great idea! as you know, i am a big brassica fan too. thanks for the recipe.

Geoffrey said...

Yum yum yum! Looks great! Is it not too bitter with raw collards though, even with added sweetener?

And in homemade mayonnaise, my former French host family always said to include a bit of (dijon) mustard too. I find this gives it a really nice flavor. Thanks!
http://bonappyall.blogspot.com/

Banu said...

Geoffrey: nope, raw collards aren't bitter at all (at least I don't think so), and I deliberately left out the dijon because of the Southern flair, but I normally add it.

Banu said...

natural selection: if you were in New York right now, you wouldn't think so; it's *horrible* out...

Bo said...

Very unusual slaw...I bet it is delicious, but the southern boy in me tells me there is just something wrong with eating a collard raw...but I'll give it a try.

Richard said...

Like I said, I need motivation to cook all the way for myself. Being single means I half ass it, lol.

Tau-Mu said...

I think it is neat that you included the nutrition information!

Richard said...

Oh, and forgot to mention, I have two other roommates and only one fridge, so bagged food kinda works right now! =p

Alisa@foodista said...

It looks wonderful! I'm saving this recipe and would love to make this soon.

natural selection said...

Banu come on over I made Cardamon spiced chocolate cakes!

Jane said...

MMM looks delicious:P

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